BLOOD TYPE DIET

Food is matter

  • Type A: Called the agrarian, or cultivator. People who are type A should eat a diet rich in plants, and completely free of “toxic” red meat. This closely resembles a vegetarian diet.

 

  • Type B: Called the nomad. These people can eat plants and most meats (except chicken and pork), and can also eat some dairy. However, they should avoid wheat, corn, lentils, tomatoes and a few other foods.

 

  • Type AB: Called the enigma. Described as a mix between types A and B. Foods to eat include seafood, tofu, dairy, beans and grains. They should avoid kidney beans, corn, beef and chicken.

 

  • Type O: Called the hunter. This is a high-protein diet based largely on meat, fish, poultry, certain fruits and vegetables, but limited in grains, legumes and dairy. It closely resembles the paleo diet.

Type A’s thrive on vegetarian diets, the inheritance of their settled farming ancestors.  It is important that you recognise your genetic heritage and adjust your diet away from meats, dairy and other foods that will disrupt your metabolism.  It is also beneficial, due to the sensitivity of the Type A digestive tract, to obtain organic, unprocessed foods whenever possible.  Type A’s are biologically predisposed to heart disease, cancer and diabetes.  If you follow this diet you can enhance your health and immune function, which may reduce your risks of developing these problems.

Foods below are presented under their broad headings as either beneficial, neutral or avoid.  Try to eat as many of the beneficial foods as possible, the neutral foods to fill out your diet and avoid the rest as often as possible.  Following the diet accurately will lead to benefits within 1-2 weeks of greater energy, reduction in symptoms of illness and fat loss (should that be necessary for your body).

 

Stress Profile

Stress is a highly personal experience, and what is incredibly stressful for one person may not create any problems for another.  How we deal with stress is more important than the absolute level of stressful events that occur in our lives.  Your blood type influences how you deal with stress and should guide your stress management techniques.

Type A’s tend to react to the first stage of stress (threat or alarm) intellectually.  This over-intellectualising can lead to anxiety, irritability and hyperactivity if unchecked.  Ongoing stress for a Type A will eventually weaken the immune system and lead to a increased susceptibility to infectious illness, heart disease and cancer.  You will not cope well with continued confrontation or exposure to stress, as Type A’s require time alone to process and deal with life events

You will benefit from approaching stressful situations calmly and using techniques to reduce the overexcited nerves.  Negative stress can be countered with ‘quieting’ techniques, such as Yoga, Tai Chi or meditation.  Other moderately intense activities such as hiking, bicycling or brisk walking are also beneficial, so long as your mind is engaged by the activity.  However, intense, competitive exercises will only leave you drained and more stressed than before you began.

 

The Type B diet is balanced and wholesome and includes a wide variety of foods.  It represents a blending of several different cultures, and provides you with the choice of the best from the animal and vegetable kingdoms.  The sturdy and alert Type B’s are usually able to resist many of the most severe diseases common to modern life, such as heart disease and cancer.  Even if they do contract these diseases, they seem more likely to survive them.  Due to the particular construction of their immune system, they are prone however to chronic viral infections and slow growing viruses, such as Multiple Sclerosis, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Lupus.

Foods below are presented under their broad headings as either beneficial, neutral or avoid.  Try to eat as many of the beneficial foods as possible, the neutral foods to fill out your diet and avoid the rest as often as possible.  Following the diet accurately will lead to benefits within 1-2 weeks of greater energy, reduction in symptoms of illness and fat loss (should that be necessary for your body).

Stress Profile

Stress is a highly personal experience, and what is incredibly stressful for one person may not create any problems for another.  How we deal with stress is more important than the absolute level of stressful events that occur in our lives.  Your blood type influences how you deal with stress and should guide your stress management techniques.

Type B’s response to stressful life events represents a balance between the intellectualizing of the event and a physically aggressive response to a challenge.  They are able to respond to different stresses in different ways, depending on what is required at the time.  This represents an evolutionary adaptation to the needs of the people at the time, who required both the aggression and stamina to fight and conquer new lands, with the creativity and sensitivity to cultivate and develop these new lands into civilizations.

Type B’s should aim to exercise regularly, and participate in activities that balance the physical demands against mental diversion.  They are often most comfortable performing exercises of moderate intensity, in the company of other people.  Some suggestions would be group bush-walking, tennis, aerobics classes, group cycling and less aggressive martial arts.  You will tend to be less effective and get less enjoyment from fiercely competitive sports such as rugby or boxing.

Blood type AB is less than 1000 years old.  It is very rare (2-5% of the world’s population), and biologically complex.  Type AB’s carry antigens for both A & B, and the diet is a fusion of the two, sometimes like one and then like the other.  In general terms, a food which is bad for either of Type A or B, will most likely be unfavourable for type AB as well.  There are some exceptions, such as tomatoes, which both Type A & B cannot tolerate, yet type AB can eat with no ill effects.

Foods below are presented under their broad headings as either beneficial, neutral or avoid.  Try to eat as many of the beneficial foods as possible, the neutral foods to fill out your diet and avoid the rest as often as possible.  Following the diet accurately will lead to benefits within 1-2 weeks of greater energy, reduction in symptoms of illness and fat loss (should that be necessary for your body).

Stress Profile

Stress is a highly personal experience, and what is incredibly stressful for one person may not create any problems for another.  How we deal with stress is more important than the absolute level of stressful events that occur in our lives.  Your blood type influences how you deal with stress and should guide your stress management techniques.

Type AB’s tend to react to the first stage of stress (threat or alarm) intellectually.  This over-intellectualising can lead to anxiety, irritability and hyperactivity if unchecked.  Ongoing stress for a Type AB will eventually weaken the immune system and lead to a increased susceptibility to infectious illness, heart disease and cancer.  You will not cope well with continued confrontation or exposure to stress, as Type AB’s require time alone to process and deal with life events

You will benefit from approaching stressful situations calmly and using techniques to reduce the overexcited nerves.  Negative stress can be countered with ‘quieting’ techniques, such as Yoga, Tai Chi or meditation.  Other moderately intense activities such as hiking, bicycling or brisk walking are also beneficial, so long as you mind is engaged by the activity.  However, intense, competitive exercises will only leave you drained and more stressed than before you began.

Type O’s thrive on intense physical exercise and animal protein.  Their digestive tracts retain the memory of their high animal protein hunter-gatherer lifestyle.  The combination of high-protein and low carbohydrate foods would have kept these people in a state of mild ketosis, where the body burns fats and protein for energy.  The combination of frequent physical activity and ketosis would have made for a lean, mean hunting machine, which is the ideal body composition for type O.

Standard dietary recommendations generally counsel against the consumption of too much animal protein due to the saturated fat content.  Modern farming techniques have lead to a dramatic increase in the levels of saturated fat, hormones and antibiotics in meat.  For the type O diet to be healthy, it is important to choose the leanest meat possible, and preferably to eat wild meat (game) or newer, organic/free range meats which are becoming available.

Foods below are presented under their broad headings as either beneficial, neutral or avoid.  Try to eat as many of the beneficial foods as possible, the neutral foods to fill out your diet and avoid the rest as often as possible.  Following the diet accurately will lead to benefits within 1-2 weeks of greater energy, reduction in symptoms of illness and fat loss (should that be necessary for your body).

Stress Profile

Stress is a highly personal experience, and what is incredibly stressful for one person may not create any problems for another.  How we deal with stress is more important than the absolute level of stressful events that occur in our lives.  Your blood type influences how you deal with stress and should guide your stress management techniques.

Type O’s have the immediate and physical response of their hunter ancestors – it goes straight to your muscles.  It permits a rapid and explosive response of physical energy to stressful events.  Type O’s become physically charged up in stressful situations, and if they are unable to relieve the energy it can lead to negative effects on your health.  Intense physical exercise is a key to Type O health, it balances the hormones, relieves muscle tension and maintains a healthy body weight.  If you want to lose weight, you must engage in regular, highly physical exercise, which acidifies the muscle and accelerates fat burning.

 

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